Tag Archive | Treaty Education

Differentiated First Nations Lesson Plan – ECS 350

ECS 350 First Nations Lesson Plan

Above is the differentiated First Nations lesson plan that my partner and I did for our ECS 350 class.

In this lesson plan, our plan was that we would get students to create a hand drum (including making hide if possible, but with the time we just gathered all the supplies) and then use this to help in math.  This first part could be done in an art or music class if possible.  The hand drum creates a circle so we would use this to discuss the grade nine unit on circle properties including central angles and inscribed angles.  While discussing the properties, students would draw/paint on their hand drums so that they have a visual representation of what they were learning.

The process of creating this lesson plan was both difficult and relatively simple.  Differentiating the lesson plan was fairly easy because for the most part, many of the students had many adaptations that were common with one another.   However, there were a few that we found very difficult to try to incorporate into our lesson plan and left out (only some though!).  Another difficulty, that was also easy in a way, was deciding how to incorporate First Nations culture or Treaty education into math.  In a way it was easy because I  feel that the education professors do a very good job at trying to make us aware and understand how to incorporate treaty education into math.  We have had a few presentations and work shops where we have learned different ways to include First Nations content and treaty education into mathematics.  The idea that we had used for our lesson plan came from a couple presenters from Leading Thunderbird Lodge, which is a residential youth treatment center for male youth.  This idea that these presenters had shared with us had originally been shared with us to fit the grade 8 curriculum which is where Ali and I had run into a few problems.  The ideas presented had to do with labeling a circle and this idea would have worked great.  However, since Ali and I are secondary education students, we tried to adapt this idea to fit into the 9-12 curriculum.  We found our outcome in the Shapes and Space unit in the grade 9 curriculum but it didn’t exactly fit with the idea presented to us.  So, after some time, Ali and I came up with the idea to change the labeling and use of the hand drum.  Instead of labeling the hand drum, we would get the students to create a number of subtended angles and their corresponding central angles.  By doing this, students could create their own generalizations about the relationship between these angles and therefore have a deeper understanding of the content.  This also creates patterns and allows students to be creative if desired.

Ali and I were very happy with the way our lesson had turned out.  However, we and others determined a few minor changes after a completing a lesson study with other classmates.  During this study, we came up with the following changes to the lesson plan (which we have not changed in the lesson plan that we have uploaded):

1. In Essential Question 1, this should be “what is the meaning of a hand drum and what is it used for?” rather than “what is a hand drum.”

2. Instead of labeling their hand drum, tracing their hand drum, and then drawing inscribed and central angles on this paper, we would get students to just draw these angles directly on the hand drum (and of course in different colours so they can tell apart each angle).

3. Also, we should include questions about what would happen if the top point of the inscribed angle changed while the bottom two points stayed the same? (they should find that the angle stays the same no matter where they move it).

4. Include graphic organizers.

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Aboriginal Canada Government Website – Treaty Education Resource

Here is a link to the Aboriginal Canada Government website.  The link will send you directly to the teacher resources which includes lesson plans and activities, curriculum and education programs, and a website to the Northern Lights School Division.  Under the lesson plans and activities, there is the Treaty Education Toolkit that, if I’m right, was discussed at the Treaty Education workshop that the pre-internship students attended last week.